Blogs

Global Innovation Commons 2.0

We at the Global Innovation Commons have decided that we need a change, a good change! While this is going to be a long and on going process we have decided to upgrade the G.I.C. to make it more user friendly. However, the only way to make it more user friendly is to get more feedback from users like yourself. We encourage you to email us at InnoCommons@m-cam.com or comment on this post and let us know what you think of the Global Innovation Commons. What tools can be added to benefit you? How can we provide the best output to get projects deployed as soon as possible? Only you have those answers! Thank you for your time and we look forward to hearing from you!

0
Your rating: None

Wacky Technology Wednesday: SOLO-TREC

Use the Earth to Record the Earth.

For years researchers have tried to figure out how to create an unmanned underwater vehicle powered by renewable resources with the ability to record ocean data. A team of academic researchers paired with NASA and the United States Navy have done just that with their Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer Thermal Recharging (SOLO-TREC). This devise uses the ocean temperature to not only generate power but in certain temperatures charge its batteries. The bot can preform many tasks which advance the world of marine biology such as ocean and climate studies. NASA has created a site where you can track the SOLO-TREC as it records the data. For more on the SOLO-TREC click HERE

0
Your rating: None

Clean Energy in Trash

In Denmark, an energy plant burns thousands of tons of household garbage and industrial waste converting the local trash into heat and electricity. For over a decade twenty-nine plants in Horsholm to Copenhagen have been used to reduce energy costs as well as reliance on oil and gas. These plants also benefit the environment by running cleaner than some fireplaces and backyard barbecues.

These plants serve over 5 million people in Denmark alone and exist all across Europe with more to be built.
However, The United States is not following suit. Landfills continue to be the place which stores most of the nations trash. There are only eighty seven trash-burning plants which very minimal plans to increase development in the future. Matt Hale, the director of the Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery of the United States Environmental Protection Agency said that not only is the EPA worried about the affect of waste-to energy plants on their recycling programs but also the amount of cheap landfills in the nation is a reason why there is no increasing trend in the development of the plants.

Many officials say that the different between going green and building a waste-to-energy plant is the idea of going green pushes for zero waste and thus defeats the purpose of having such plants. But how unrealistic are the officials who believe that monster cities, like New York City will one day go with out trash. However, if built plants could decrease heating costs, increase recycling rates, and raises home values.

For more from the New York Times article click HERE

0
Your rating: None

Historical Commons Monday: Boston Common

Massachusetts. 1634:

An earlier settler, William Blaxton, sold the approximately 50 acres of land that would become the Boston Common to the Massachusetts Bay colonists. All the people of the colony participated in funding its purchase, with each family paying at least 6 shillings of the total 30 pounds.

It was then decided that this land would always be left open for anyone to graze their cattle on, as well as serve as a place for the colony’s militia to train. No one would be allowed to build individual lots or planting areas for private purposes.

Additionally, limits were placed on the number of animals that could graze the common pasture at one time to prevent overgrazing (see “Tragedy of the Commons”), and rules stipulating that users of the commons were responsible for disposing of any animal carcasses or other litter left in the common area. A fine was established to punish those who used the commons as a dump for trash or rocks off their own land.

Today, the Boston Common still remains public land for its people and is one of the oldest city parks in the United States of America. We need to look into our future and find not only land but other resources and begin to use them as in commons to usher in a new way of living.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Source: 5. DeWolfe Howe, Mark Antony Jr. “Boston Common: Scenes from Four Centuries.” 2-5. The Riverside Press Cambridge, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1921. Available from http://books.google.com/books?id= LrIBAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=boston+common&cd=1#v=onepa ge&q=&f=false. Internet; accessed 6 February 2010.

0
Your rating: None

Violence in Reynosa Slows Possible Projects

Since 1994 Faith Ministry has been building houses in Mexican towns helping close to five thousand people. Their WE CONNECT mission teams cross the border from America into the poorest of poor Mexican communities and work with the local people to build homes for the families which need it the most. What most Americans do not realize is that just below Texas are third world conditions in some cases where families live in cardboard boxes, children do not attend school, and medical care is rarely available.

For a couple of years now we have had the opportunity to work with Faith Ministry and recently were visited by their Executive Director, David Rodriguez. Upon his visit we discussed the possibility of expanding our work with him from not only building the homes once a year but a full scale project with the inclusion of a Heritable Innovation Trust as well as another M-CAM Inc. project the Global Innovation Commons.

The cities in which Mr. Rodriguez and the Faith Ministry have worked face growing problems in three specific areas: lack of clean water and an abundance of both plastic and biomass. We hope that in the future we can use the open-source technology included in the Global Innovation Commons to create a solution to these problems with the outcomes being placed into a Heritable Innovation Trust.

While we are in the process of working on making these projects come to life with their Board of Directors, we have hit a very large roadblock, increasing drug- related violence in the Mexican cities specifically surrounding Reynosa. We had the opportunity to touch base with him and find out how the violence is affecting him and the Faith Ministry.

He informed us that the Faith Ministry is working non stop to figure out what is next and make sure that the people and families he works with are safe. He had the chance to visit Reynosa over the past few days and said that it was calm but the problem with the drug cartels is that you never know when there will be an act of violence. There have also been increasing rumors that the violence is coming from two specific cartels which are fighting over the territorial claim to illegally smuggle the drugs into the United States. While he is excited to work with us, his current focus is to make sure the people are safe. He said that he will keep people posted with updates as he knows more.

We hope that everyone involved in Faith Ministry, as well as all of people of Mexico are safe and unharmed by the violence and hope that it will soon come to an end.

0
Your rating: None

Featured Website Friday: Facing The Future

Today's featured site (http://www.facingthefuture.org/) is a site focused on not only a company which believes in having a global perspective but also critical thinking and teaching for the future. Reaching over 12 million students each years they work to reach students and teachers in all walks of life and prepare them for academic success hoping to spark interest in complex global issues. Their topics include Poverty, Population, Consumption, Peace/Conflict, and Environment. Teachers have reported that using Facing the Future's curriculum and programs they have seen big success. For example. 86% of teachers observed an increased student engagement when using the resources.

As we begin to work on what we foresee as a second version of the Global Innovation Commons we hope to include an education section to teach children in similar ways. We hope to incorporate an exciting way to engage students in learning about our topics and the open source technology which can be deployed immediately to solve the world's problems.

0
Your rating: None

Coulson Sickle Cell Foundation of Sierra Leone

Sickle Cell Anemia is a growing problem in many countries around the world. Sierra Leone is one of these countries. The Coulson Sickle Cell Foundation is a non-profit organization which provides awareness and support to the communities with in Sierra Leone that are plagued by the devastating effects of sickle-cell disease. Most of the children die from the disease due to the lack of information and treatment provided to the families. The Coulson Sickle Cell Foundation plans to start a program that would provide pain medication and possible treatments to those children with sickle cell. They are just one of the many organizations trying to help children with this disease.

However what many readers may be shocked to find is that the Global Innovation Commons provides close to 5,000 documents in which include solutions and treatments in Sierra Leone that can be deployed today because they are open source. With the combination of the passion given by the Coulson Sickle Cell Foundation and the technology that the G.I.C. can provide we really do have the solutions to world problems at our fingertips. I challenge you all to pick a topic you are passionate about, select an area of the world that needs your help, and take a look at what the G.I.C. can provide. We CAN start solving problems and making the world a truly better place to live in.

0
Your rating: None

The Life Straw

As the Global Innovation Commons community grows and expands we become more and more aware oh the problems facing not only our users but to the world's population. When the G.I.C. first came to life it was called the "Water for India" project because our main focus was to provide open source technology to the government of India in hopes for them to get clean water to over 300 million people in a very short period of time. When we saw what we could provide to those in need in India we knew there was more to our data sources than met the eye which is how the Global Innovation Commons was born. As it was once said, "It is important to know where you have been in order to know where you are going" and for that very reason we bring to our users and readers, the LifeStraw for our Wacky Technology Wednesday.

The LifeStraw is a hand held water purifier which provides those in need a "practical way of preventing disease and saving lives". By providing safe clean drinking water to those who have to worry about taking a sip we can begin to eradicate disease and improve the lives of so many. To learn more about the LifeStraw click HERE

0
Your rating: None

Green Technology at International Auto Show

In New York City car manufactures came together for an International Auto Show but instead of typical gas guzzlers from previous shows, this year the highlight was green automobiles. While many people remain skeptical of the "green fad" automakers know that cleaner car technology leads to "high miles per gallon year after year". (John Wiebe, CEO of GLOBE Foundation). The GLOBE Foundation is a non-for-profit organization which is "dedicated to finding practical business-oriented solutions to the world's environmental problems". By being conscious consumer we can help the auto industry make the shift to using renewable energy to power our vehicles in an effort to help have a cleaner environment.

Some may inquire how the G.I.C. can fit into the auto industry, but by looking into our renewable energy module of the database you can take the technology which was patented in the 1980's and is now open source and create vehicles using clean technology. We all need to take the step forward and the G.I.C. can help us to get there.

To read more on the International Auto Show click HERE
To read more on the GLOBE Foundation click HERE

0
Your rating: None

Historical Commons Monday: Virginia, Early 17th Century Algonquian land customs

The native tribes of eastern Virginia had essentially a land stewardship system. Individuals could use any land for planting and it would not be interfered with as long as it was in use. However, if the people planting there decided to use different land, anyone else could immediately start planting on the old land. That is, no person had a permanent claim of ownership to land; it was temporarily assigned to the people using it and when left unused it immediately became common land open to anyone.

Areas of forest for hunting and waters for fishing were divided based on the territorial boundaries of regional chiefs. This meant that people had to hunt and fish in the areas designated for their village, but these grounds were not owned by any individual who could keep other people out at will. As long as a person lived in the area, he or she could freely hunt or fish anywhere in the nearby woods and rivers.

0
Your rating: None
Syndicate content